Health AGEnda

Amy Berman

About Amy Berman

Amy J. Berman, BS, RN, is a Senior Program Officer at the Hartford Foundation, with primary oversight of the Developing and Disseminating Models of Care portfolio.

Remembering Jessie Gruman

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published  Aug. 15 on the Health Affairs Blog.

Jessie Gruman: "an elegant, gracious, yet fierce warrior advocate."

Jessie Gruman: “an elegant, gracious, yet fierce warrior advocate.”

Jessie Gruman, founding president of the Center for Advancing Health, died on July 14 after a fifth bout with cancer. Jessie was a hero to patients, families, and health care providers for her selfless work to help people better understand their role and responsibilities in supporting their own health.

Continue reading

Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy Achieves Impressive Results

GNLA_2014_400

The latest cohort of fellows in Sigma Theta Tau International’s Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy pose for a group photo with their leadership mentors, faculty, and representatives of Sigma Theta Tau and the Hartford Foundation.

I recently traveled to Indianapolis, home to Sigma Theta Tau International, the honor society of nursing. There I met six very special individuals, competitively selected as fellows in Sigma’s Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy.

The Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy aims to prepare and position geriatric-expert nurses as leaders within the interprofessional health care delivery environment. The fellows I had the honor of meeting expressed an unwavering commitment to developing their influence and impact in hospitals, nursing homes, and home health to benefit vulnerable elders.

Continue reading

Narrative Matters, The Next Chapter: Amy Berman Reflects On ‘Living Life In My Own Way’

Amy Berman speaks at TEDMED's  Great Challenges in Health Care in 2013.

Amy Berman speaks at TEDMED’s Great Challenges in Health Care in 2013.

Editor’s Note: In this post, originally published on Health Affairs Blog, Amy Berman shares more of her story as a person living with stage IV cancer who has chosen a palliative care approach.

She contributes  regularly to Health AGEnda about her experiences and how they relate to the John A. Hartford Foundation’s support for palliative care for older adults facing serious illness. In March 2014, the Hartford Foundation awarded a new grant to the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) to build on the successful spread of hospital-based palliative care and move these services into care settings outside the hospital.

Continue reading

Can Health Care Point to True North?

Gary Oftedahl, MD, Chief Knowledge Officer for the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement, speaks at the CaRe Align initiative launch in Dallas.

Gary Oftedahl, MD, Chief Knowledge Officer for the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement, speaks at the CaRe Align initiative launch in Dallas.

Older adults who typically live with many chronic conditions see, on average, two primary care providers and five specialists per year in four different medical practices. Such fragmentation and logistical complexities are problematic for providers and patients.

For a hypothetical primary care practice consisting of 30 percent Medicare patients, each of whom has four or more chronic conditions, the physician must coordinate with 86 other providers in 36 practices over a year’s time.

Continue reading

New Report Examines Burden of Caregiving on Spouses

Click on image for a PDF of the report.

Click on image for a PDF of the report.

All family caregivers are not alike. A new Insight on the Issues report, Family Caregivers Providing Complex Chronic Care to Their Spouses, shows that the burden of caregiving disproportionately impacts spouses. The report was produced by the AARP Public Policy Institute and the United Hospital Fund  and supported by grant funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation.

Adult children and spouses are the primary caregivers of our nation’s older adults. They provide critically important assistance that helps frail elders remain at home, from meal preparation to such complex medical/nursing tasks as medication management, wound care, and care coordination.

Continue reading

The Direct Care Workforce: Fundamental to the Health of Communities

Steven Dawson of PHI addresses the briefing on direct care workers held recently by Philanthropy New York.

Steven Dawson of PHI addresses the briefing on direct care workers held recently by Philanthropy New York.

The health of any given community is fragile and complex. It is greater than the sum of individual health outcomes or access to care. The health of a community rests upon an infrastructure that meets the changing demands and needs of its people within constrained resources. Increasingly, our infrastructure needs to address employment, economic stability, and rising health care costs.

This is especially true given the sea change occurring, with 10,000 people turning age 65 each day in the United States. The maturing of the boomers is fundamentally shifting our view of what a healthy community looks like.

Continue reading

Practice Change Leaders Improve Care for Older Adults

PCL_Color_Logo_250Change is hard. It takes leadership to drive change. Robert Jarvik—a former John A. Hartford Foundation grantee and inventor of the artificial heart—once said, “Leaders are visionaries with a poorly developed sense of fear and no concept of the odds against them.”

Today’s successful leaders need that same vision, but they also require a set of skills that go far beyond their clinical training and experience. They need strategies to address policy and payment methodology. They need to engage stakeholders. And they need to measure what matters in terms of cost and quality.

In order to develop this new kind of leadership, people capable of driving health care redesign for vulnerable elders, the Hartford Foundation funds—in partnership with The Atlantic Philanthropies—the Practice Change Leaders Program.

Continue reading

Breast Cancer: Are We Making Strides?

Amy Berman, left, and her daughter Stephanie at the American Cancer Society's Making Strides event in New York's Central Park.

Amy Berman, left, and her daughter Stephanie at the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides event in New York’s Central Park.

Maggie Mahar is an influential blogger on topics from health care reform to the economy. Maggie and I agree that we are not making sufficient strides in the war on breast cancer. We disagree that I chose life over longevity. I chose life and longevity.

In honor of breast cancer awareness month, Maggie has allowed us to repost a blog she featured in HealthBeat on Oct. 11th. I am grateful that she uses her potent prose to draw attention to the needs of older adults. Cancer is, after all, primarily a disease of aging. Two-thirds of those living with cancer are age 65 or older.

Continue reading

What the Heck Are Hartford’s New Funding Areas? Part Three: Models of Care

Jürgen Unützer, MD, brings the IMPACT model of depression care to Casper, Wy.

Jürgen Unützer, MD, brings the IMPACT model of depression care to Casper, Wy.

Given the John A. Hartford Foundation’s  focus on improving the health of older Americans, it should come as no surprise that the Foundation has looked for opportunities to create a more comprehensive, coordinated and continuous health care delivery system.

Since the 1990s, we’ve done this by investing in the development, testing, and spread of effective and affordable Models of Care to address barriers to the provision of high-quality, cost-effective care for elders.

Continue reading

ACES Faces and Cases Spread to New Places

This year’s ACES faculty sessions were strictly standing room only.

New nurses need to be competent in the care they provide to older adults. Yet nursing faculty may lack geriatric preparation and may not be comfortable teaching the content.

ACES—or Advancing Care Excellence for Seniors—is a national program led by the National League for Nursing and Community College of Philadelphia aimed at addressing this important issue.

Continue reading